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true drawdown from afghanistan over the next two years than i think any of our military planners and reconstruction officials had hoped for or expected. he has just published the first quarterly report of 2013. we look forward to hearing what he has been finding in afghanistan and what his views are on the future for of the reconstruction program in afghanistan. >> thank you very much. pleasure to be here. i have to apologize. for those of you in afghanistan, you hit the kabul crud in winter. i will try to speak through that today. it is an honor to be here at csis. in many ways it is a bit of a homecoming. i see old friends of mine. i worked for over 15 years for the chairman of the csis board of trustees. he has been a tireless leader since 2000. in many ways, those 15 years that i spent help prepare me for my current job. i saw firsthand what congressional oversight can do to improve policies of the united states government. this was later reinforced when i had a great opportunity to work with who i think many people have viewed as the father of oversight. from both of them, a
our operation in afghanistan is our mission, but we have other ongoing operations. one of them is the balkans in kosovo, and since 1999 nato has been in engaged in the balkans with great success. we have been the guarantor of peace and stability in that part of europe. so that's one mission. we have an ongoing counter-piracy mission along the coast of somalia and we have a counter-terrorism operation in, in the mediterranean. so nato is still very busy. >> all of these operations that nato does, and we have 150,000 troops on three continents conducting missions. we draw those lessons. we get better like any person or any organization, we learn from our mistakes. we also learn from our successes and i would argue that the nato alliance is prepared to take on future operations. >> but there are also shortcomings. >> nato is one the greatest alliances the world has ever seen, a great peacetime alliance. inclusive - brought in the countries of the former east block, of the former warsaw pact. offered them that hope and brought them in after the end of the cold war. it is an amazing
on troop withdrawal in afghanistan or the follow on force? have you spoken to the general about what their recommendations -- about what the recommendations are? >> no. >> there was a report in the washington post found that there was a reduction in salt of no more than 25,000 troops during that -- sought of no more than 25,000 troops during the same period. would that surprise you? have you followed in the of the public reporting? >> i have read some of what is in the media. my experience is that that is not always accurate. >> let me follow up. there are military officials saying pulling out 34,000 leads to a dangerously low military personnel level while the fledgling afghan police need our support. it will send a signal that america's commitment to afghanistan is going wobbly. i am surprised that you have not had conversations about this important question at this point. if we are in a position where withdrawal puts us in a situation where we are going to be dangerously low on military personnel, i would expect you to come forward to this committee and tell us your professional o
and specific, part of american history tv. >> now, it discuss an unlisted of journalism in afghanistan. from a washington, a journal, this is 35 minutes. host: abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is the executive director of the nai media institute in afghanistan. your begin with organization first. what is it and how are you funded? guest: first of all, a warm hello from miles away in afghanistan. one of the first media supporting organizations established in afghanistan in 2004. we started our activities in europe in commission from a news network. we are doing advocacy for media in afghanistan. we are based in the capital city of kabul. we are in the north, in the south in kandahar. host: how much money do you get from the united states? guest: it depends. from the beginning up to now, it is millions. in 2012 it was 800. host: million? guest: $800,000. host: what is the main goal? guest: to support the idea of open media in the country. and to say what are the basic rights, and what open media and access to information, free information, and access to free information is for its citizens? it is somet
will come home from afghanistan. this drawdown will continue. by the end of next year, our war in afghanistan will be over. >> while obama says the war will be over next year, the pentagon says the troops will remain until the 2024. we will speak to activist kathy kelly. and we will speak to aura bogado about what he did not say about immigration. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama gave further details on his second term agenda tuesday night with the annual state of the union address. on the environment, obama called on lawmakers to take action against global warming with a number of victims of gun violence in attendance, obama also urged congress to vote on new gun control measures, including background checks and bans on massive ammunition magazines. >> congress will not act soon enough to protect future generations. i will. i will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take now and in the future to reduce pollution, prepare our communities or the consequences of climate change, and speed th
, an incredible woman, running to be president of afghanistan. you heard me right, woman, afghanistan, presidency. very excited to be speaking to hemple incredible story. we're going to turn to one of our favorite nights of year. hot off the presses one day old expanded coverage of last night's state of the union address. president barack obama hits the floor for some reason with republican congressman eric cantor in tow in no way making this seem like a charismatic star performer walking the red carpet with his agent. baby doll we gotta move. mario lopez has a satellite window we have to him. [laughter] [cheers and applause] i'm sore i'm -- sorry. just sweat age bit. i'm just going to, just going to -- get something to drink here. [laughter] just so thirsty i can't -- sorry. should have drank something before the show. i don't know why i didn't think after this. anyway it's the state of union so as the late great ed koch would say, how we doing? >> a family with children making the minimum wage stills lives below the poverty. there's communities where no matter how hard you work it's virtually i
in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus. it is something to not forget it. host: how to afghanis receive their news? guest: we have different tools of
by extremist who operate in the border area between afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. ♪ good morning. good afternoon, everybody. welcome. i'm steve cool i'm the president of new america foundation. it's my pleasure to welcome do you to the event briefly and introduce our subject, which from our perspective involves the launch of the book that somebody will hold up for the audience. since i don't have a copy. "talibanistan." i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter. you'll hear discussed today struck us as worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america lead by peter bergen who will be the host and moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine who is not here with us today. coed ditted this book from the oxford university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversit
pleased to talk to you about my year in afghanistan. i'd like to thank the san francisco fleet week association, lewis loeven, specifically, major general myat, always a mentor, former secretary of state schultz and mrs. schultz, mrs. perry, honored to be in your presence. the uss makin island, chief of the fairest city in the world, san francisco, and he esteemed professionals. this is nice, i'm going to move south of here and take you to afghanistan. as you know we have marines, soldiers, sailors in afghanistan currently, but i'm going to bring you to when i was there during 2010 and 2011 after the president decided to surge the forces. first marine decision, first marine expeditionary force forward entered southwest afghanistan during 2009. we arrived in 2010 so it was a bit more stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand
and afghanistan. he testified before the senate arms committee on thursday. general austen was joined by the nominee for u.s. africa command, general david rodriguez, a top commander in afghanistan from 2007-2011. this is two hours. le conversations] >> good morning everybody and welcome. this morning the committee considers the nominations of two very distinguished officers to two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united stes army nominated to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. afri command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifice
it institute said afghanistan. host: good morning, everyone. welcome to "washington journal." here are the morning headlines. yesterday the senate voted to begin debate on the renewal of violence against women act. the bill will then move to the house by the end of the week. congressional budget office will give its 2013 economic outlook. and the no. 2 republican, eric cantor, outlined the gop agenda. look for our coverage of those events and more on c-span.org. gun control is dominating the newspapers this morning with reports that both sides are likely to agree to criminal background checks, but an assault weapons ban might be harder to pass through congress. president obama said the vast majority of americans agree with the proposal. your thoughts? for democrats, 202-585-3880. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for independents, 202-585-3882. also, on social media, twitter.com/c-spanwj. or post your comment question on facebook. and you can e-mail us as well, journal@c-span.org. president obama was in minneapolis yesterday talking about gun control. here is what he had to say on bac
of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we have two problems as i sit here today. we have an immediate problem in fiscal year 2013, which has about eight months left. we have a longer-term problem due to potential full sequestration. in fiscal year 2013, the combination of a continuing resolution, a shortfall of overseas contingency afghanistan funds and the sequester has resulted in a $18 billion sh
of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing security throughout their country, the coalition forces stepping back through a support role. on tuesday, president obama announced during his state of the union address plans for drawing down half of the 66,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan this year, a 34,000 troop reduction by february of 2014. the president continues to consider options for a significantly reduced u.s. military presence in afghanistan after the end of 2014, which will depend on many things but in part on negotiations with the government of afghanistan over legal protections for our troops. the president has made clear that then missions of residual u.s. presence in afghanistan after 2014 will be limited to current terrorism operations and training and advising afghan forces. general austin would bring exceptional experience in overseeing this transition, having commanded u.s. forces in iraq during the reduction of u.s. forces and equipment from iraq. jus
the crime and automatic weapons, why doesn't the president use those troops from afghanistan to fight crime? the best way to do that is take the gangs off the street and get the weapons back from the gangs. host: that is ralph from mansfield, ohio. you can choose a line that best represents you on the president calling for his proposal yesterday -- looking at them and asking congress several times to take a vote on that. choose the number that best represents you on the screen. you can also send us comments on twitter and facebook. joseph adding that, "i thought the second amendment to the constitution was already ratified by the nation?" give us a call or put a thought on facebook. staten island new york, republican line, dennis, co- head. caller: as far as the vote, i think it should come up for a vote. i am kind ambiguous about this. the second amendment says the right to bear arms -- really it says "the right to bear arms, and the government is not to interfere with it." the founding fathers put that into the constitution for just in case we get a president who becomes a tyrant. no matt
almost $90 billion to rebuild afghanistan. monday special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction, john sopko delivered a report on you for spending so far show in the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused building. his remarks from the center for strategic and international studies in washington d.c. rfid the minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. thanks for coming today. my name name is robert laman and director of the program in crisis conflict and cooperation here at csis. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sopko who is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction known by the acronym sigar. mr. sopko has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional counsel, senior federal government adviser. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at co
in iraq and afghanistan. they carried out to separate operations, one to her skull and 12 per year. the red line chose the path of bullets as it passed through her head. the impact and bruised her brain, but the bullet did not enter it, and that dramatically improved her recovery chances. a titanium plate was fitted to repair her shattered skull. it required a delicate surgery, very close to the lining up for brain. a copley implant should restore some hearing to her damaged ear. today the doctor who fitted the titanium plate said that she was recovering well. >> i expect her to recover and continue with our education and hopefully go on to university. >> that education is the point, the cost for which he suffered, and to which she is now devoted. >> when you educate a girl, you educate the whole family. you educate a generation. you educate all the other coming children. >> in launching the malala fund, she shows a determination to turn this terrible experience into something positive. quite courage and resolution have turned a 15-year-old schoolgirl into a powerful, global symbol
learned a lesson with respect to the surge in afghanistan. and it may have not really wanted to do that but he was convinced by the military to do it and he regrets it. >> well, that's not the case. let me-- let me says that's not true. let me say two or three things about this. first of all, the point you make referencing the president's west point speech where he indicated what is an iron law of history, there aren't a lot of iron laws of history but this is maybe one, which is and i think i'm paraphrasing as you did, that no countries have been able to maintain its military and political privacy in the world without maintaining its economic vitality. absolutely true, has been the focus of our national security policy. and the first term will be the focus of-- and this is, the long analysis we can go too about that but i think it is an iron law of history. second, with respect to afghanistan, the president saw a deteriorating situation there. when we reviewed, the situation in afghanistan we came into office we did not think there was a strategy or properly resourced effort in af
that as long lasting and not just a function of our relationship with the united states on afghanistan as the transition out of the region. >> thank you for that. did they offer you breakfast? >> yes, they did. >> oh, ok. i was so busy taking notes. a couple of questions and i will turn it over to my colleagues. i want to ask about the impact, if any, that having john kerry as secretary of state is going to have. what is your sense of the importance, if any, of his appointment? >> i think that pakistan-u.s. relations are vital to both countries and we appreciate very much the fact that the state department has been one of our best interlocutors through different -- a difficult times as we look for better times as we craft policy together. secretary kerry brings knowledge and experience of the region as well as policy. i have to say that i take this opportunity to also appreciate and thank the outgoing secretary of state, the inevitable mrs. clinton -- the inevitable -- inimitable mrs. clinton she did a wonderful job in representing the views of the united states abroad. we welcome john
of the world's refugees are from afghanistan and iran host as large number but thousands are being forced across the border. coping with the new arrivals is just one of the challenges afghanistan faces. jennifer is at a refugee transit center. can you give us an idea of what life is like for these refugees? >> we're here at the trancity center about 120 miles from the iranian border. we're expecting in the next hour or two as the day finishes at least 50 refugees to come here to this transit center where they'll spend a little bit of their time. they're coming from the border 120 miles nearby iran we spent a couple of days there earlier this week and spoke to afghans coming back not because they want to but because iran is forcing them to. >> coming back to the homeland. as they take their first few steps inside afghanistan, many of these afghans say life in iran was hard. >> they mistreated us. getting here wasn't easy. if you go right they take money from you. if you go left they say it's illegal and want money from you. they don't even treat us like humans. >> last year, iran threatene
evans has the breaking news. a major withdrawal of u.s. forces from afghanistan. we'll preview the president's announcement which will come in tonight's state of the union. major garrett is at the white house. charlie d'agata in afghanistan. her parents will be with the first lady tonight. her alleged killers are in jail. dean reynolds on the shooting death of hadiya pendleton. and the taliban robbed afghanistan of its musical soul. but he is bringing it back. >> we can speak in a common language of humanity which is the language of music. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, the most-wanted man in california, fired los angeles cop christopher dorner, appears to be surrounded tonight. he's holed up in a house in san bernardino county east of l.a. dorner was discovered by fish and game officers a little after noon local time today. there have been gun battles and two officers have been wounded. their condition is unknown. this is the sound of one of those gun battles recorded by our correspondent carter evans. (gu
're try to take the joint force, but in my case, the army, as we complete combat operations in afghanistan, then reset our equipment, reorient our force and be prepared to deal with a broader weight of challenges that are defined in the defense to strategies that we rolled out last year, when we put a lot of thought into about where we want to go as a defense department in the future. we need to approach these problems, as tough as they are, with an understanding of the fundamental role the army plays in providing our nation's security. this morning i would like to describe the strategic and physical challenges that the army faces, the joint force faces, and the impact it will have on the future, to include its readiness, size, and other things as we move forward. before i do, i would like to take a moment to reflect on the basic building blocks of the army, and that is the american soldier. and staff sergeant romesha was presented the medal of honor by president. his heroism symbolizes the caliber of the men and women serving today. it's hard to give credit to the american people just how
there are people who are dying in war whether it's in afghanistan or mali or syria or congo or myanmar, colombia, many other countries. all these people are victims. they're being ravaged by unconventional warfare. but the term, as i say, is off. because this is, in fact, the norm. we have to adjust our thinking, we have to flip our thinking 360 degrees and understand that unconventional warfare is the dominant face of warfare. always has been, always will be. every great power throughout history, every great jenin colluding the great generals of antiquity had to deal with the threat of unconventional warfare including, of course, the greatest army of all, the roman legions. a pretty formidable force even when they were not led by russell crowe. [laughter] they bested every, every power in their neighborhood. but rome, as we also know, was brought down, sacked in the fifth century. and what was responsible for the downfall of rome? well, rome was much like the united states in that it did not have great power rivals. it was not surrounded by great states. ultimately, it was basically surrounded
places i go and i'll ask you today. how many of you are aware of the fact in afghanistan today, there's 5 point 2 million children going to school and 1 point 8 million of those are female and in 2000 there was only 8 hundred 6,000 kids in school. how many of you know that fact? one, two, you? so that makes my total now - i've counted 21 people in america. to me that's single most incredible inspiring news to come out of that country. that alone is justification for the sacrifice and cost and the investment in that country and nobody in america is aware of that. the media, government, the people. to me that news should be broadcast from every mountain top in this publication called hope we write about that. go and tell people there's some really good things happening and it's related to employ kabs and the number of kids in afghanistan it's gone up six fold since 2000. unfortunately there's other forces at work. in the last year the taliban have bombed more than 400 mostly girls schools and it's travesty. what's amazing if you go back, they've been written off the government records and n
>> nato get a top man in afghanistan'. >> this is al-jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, testing it's might. thousands in the capital. happy chinese new year. millions welcoming the new year of the snake. industry allies in washington and how they're helping to keep the people back. a new commander is in charge of nato forces in afghanistan. he has been given the responsibility of winding down the longest war. dunfor ofd took command and he will be handing over security to the afghan security forces. >> what has not changed is the will of this coalition. what has not changed is the discipline and the spirit of the team. what has not changed is the growing capability of our f. kemp partners and the afghan national security forces. what has not changed is our commitment to accomplish the mission. more importantly, what has not changed is the inevitability of our success. >> the u.s. commander in afghanistan faces tough challenges. among them, republicans questioning whether he is the right man for the job. >> with the u.s. looking forward to december 31st,
takes charge of the forces in afghanistan, but what are the challenges he faces? and that the chinese new year. more than a billion people around the world aren't really in the do your of the stake. -- in that do year of the snake. to these is in the middle of what's being called its biggest political crisis since the country unleashed the arabs from uprising two years ago. in the latest twist, the secular party has withdrawn his ministers from a coalition government. hamadi jebali. opposition leader was -- opposition leader, shokri belaid, a shot dead. by saturday, but the party only agreed to a national unity government comprise the politicians. a deadline to form a national unity government expired on sunday without agreement, which is why the president's party has withdrawn. >> news here in tunis coming from party officials that one of these secular parties inside the government's coalition is to allow will deal a heavy blow to prime minister, hamadi jebali, and his plan to form a government of technocrats. he said saturday night if his plan fails, he would resign. he said he was
the state of the union to announce a sharp reduction in u.s. troop levels in afghanistan. 34,000 service personnel will return home by early next year. about half the number currently deployed to the country. some afghans have welcomed the prospect of more control over their own security you while others are concerned afghan soldiers are unprepared. is a spoexz person for the afghan defense ministry on wednesday expressed confidence that local forces are ready to lead combat operations. >> translator: the afghan defense ministry welcomes the decision by the u.s. to withdraw 34,000 troops over the next year. we are ready to fill the vacuum and we are also ready to take full responsibility for security in 2013. >> all u.s. combat forces are scheduled to withdraw from afghanistan by the end of 2014. some afghan civilians are concerned about the pace of the drawdown as long as islam inc., militants continue their attacks. they want to know afghanistan's own forces are ready for the job. >> translator: american forces should leave afghanistan but afghan security forces should be encourage and
key talks on the afghan peace process involving the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan at his country retreat north of london. the talks are focusing on cross border security and how to engage the table ineffective peace talks. the bbc's david looks at what all the leaders hope to gain from the summit. >> all three of these leaders have a stake in improving stability between afghanistan and pakistan. president karzai has long believed pakistan has been blocking their attempts at peace. afghanistan wants more including the former table leader. and david cameron wants stability as the british troops come home although president karzai announced a sour note saying they were leaving because perhaps they realized they had been fighting in the wrong place and that the province was more peaceful before the invasion and pakistan increasingly believe the table are a threat to their stability until recently they saw the table as clients who would serve their interests. fighting in the border region has cost thousands of pakistani lives and the girl shot while going to school brought many togeth
appropriated almost $90 billion to rebuild afghanistan. on monday, a report was delivered on u.s. spending, showing the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused portion. this will be about 15 minutes. >> good morning, and thank you for coming. my name is robert lamm. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john stossel, who is the special senior adviser, john. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation on energy and commerce and has also been at the homeland security office as well. i would like to thank the chairman as well, he was on the senate investigation committee and he has worked at the justice department and today he is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction. we are now entering our 12 year in conflict. as we are all aware, the reconstruction program has not always gone as desired and as expected. we have rotating military into afghanistan today. many thousands of troops are on the ground. and we have what is expected to be no a more rapid troop drawdown from afghanistan over the next two years than any of our milita
the ahead community -- special inspector general for afghanistan says the u.s. spent more than $50 billion to help build a afghan national security force. he said the u.s. is missing key information about the force. he spoke to the center of strategic and international study. >> welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sofco who is the special inspector general for the afghanistan construct. he has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional council, senior government advisor. he has been the chief council for oversight and investigations for the house committee on energy and commerce. has also been on chief overseek council at the homeland security. under then senator sam nun, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation state. he has worked at commerce at the justice department and at the state and federal level. today, he is the special inspector general for afghanistan's restructure. we are entering our 12th year in that conflict. i wish that i can report that reconstruction is complete. unfortunately, we do know compared to ten years ago, there has
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,110 (some duplicates have been removed)

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